pink gemstone inspiration board 
Pink gemstones symbolise unconditional love and nurturing, in other words, they represent a love for oneself and others. Whether it's a vivid shade of raspberry pink or a softer pastel gemstone tone, there is a pink gem perfect for adorning yourself or the one you love...
 

1. PINK SPINEL

pink spinel gemstones

ORIGIN
Tanzania, Madagascar, Sri Lanka (the old Ceylon), Vietnam, Myanmar (the old Burma), Tajikistan.
For centuries, the main historic source of red and pink spinels has been modern day Afghanistan and Tajikistan; however, spinel has also been mined in Ceylon and Burma. A younger mining area known especially for these beautiful pink gems today is Tanzania.

COLOURS
Spinels come in many colours but the most coveted are the traffic light reds, vibrant pinks and exquisite pink-orange hues.

WHY YOU’LL LOVE PINK SPINEL
Spinels have great hardness and transparency and often have far better clarity than pink sapphires or rubies! This adds to the spinel’s excellent sparkling brilliance thereby making it one of the top gemstones for fine jewellery. 

pink spinel gem notes

HOW TO WEAR PINK SPINEL

"I prefer a red or pink spinel rather than a ruby or pink sapphire as spinels are more clean inside the stone than rubies and sapphires and can even sparkle more! (Except when you go for the best quality rubies and sapphires which are extremely rare and come with a hefty price tag)." says Eva Meijer.

Getting engaged? Try a lighter pastel pink hue. As spinels have a strong brilliance (in other words, they sparkle a lot), this variety comes close to a diamond but with a hint of romantic pink. Of course, if you prefer a statement ring, certainly opt for the deeper colours, such as its historic red and intense pink hues.

BY SEASON
⭐️ For summer, try bolder, brilliant pigments like splashy pink or a stone that sparkles with orange undertones.
⭐️ For winter, heat up with warmer reds and darker reddish-pinks. Or instead, go for softer pastels that lighten and brighten those long, cold nights.
 
A PEEK INTO THE HISTORY OF PINK SPINEL
Two famous old red spinels in history are:
 
⭐️ The Black Prince’s 'ruby'
⭐️ The Timur 'ruby'
 
The Black Prince’s 'ruby' - or red spinel as it actually is - is set in England’s Imperial State Crown and displayed in the Tower of London. Its name first appears in the historical records of Moorish Spain in the 14th century as the possession of Abū Sa'īd, the Moorish Prince of Granada. Through several wars and conquests, the stone eventually ended up with the Prince of Wales, the Black Prince, who received it as a payment for a victory of battle.


The Timur 'ruby' has illustrious provenance too. Ranging from Mughal emperors to Persian rulers, and ultimately being acquired by Maharaja Ranjit Singh in 1813. When the British annexed the Punjab in 1849, they took possession of the Timur ruby (and the famous Koh-i-Noor diamond by the way) from the last Maharaja of the Sikh Empire. The East India Company then presented the Timur Ruby to Queen Victoria as a gift in 1851...

DID YOU KNOW?
⭐️ For centuries, spinel has been mistaken for ruby and regarded as such in Europe’s crown jewels. It wasn’t until 1783 that the French mineralogist Jean Baptiste Louis Rome de l'Isle distinguished spinel as a different mineral from ruby, and this high quality gemstone has often been underappreciated ever since.
⭐️ High jewellery designers, such as Dior, Louis Vuitton, Harry Winston and Chanel use spinel gemstones along with other coloured gemstones or diamonds.
⭐️ The Samarian spinel is believed to be the largest fine spinel in the world. It is a red 500 carat gemstone that is part of the Iranian Crown Jewels.
⭐️ Historically, red and rose-hued spinels were often referred to as balas rubies. This may have referred to their historic country of origin, called Badakshan - today’s area of Afghanistan and Tajikistan.

2. PINK SAPPHIRE

pink sapphire gemstones

ORIGIN
Madagascar, Sri Lanka (the old Ceylon), Myanmar (the old Burma) and East Africa

COLOURS
Sapphires come in every colour  but red → a “red sapphire” would be called a ruby. Rubies and sapphires belong to the corundum family. Although the most famous sapphire is the blue sapphire, pink sapphires are gaining momentum. That’s because these pink gems come in a variety of shades ranging from powdery hues, to bubble gum or ‘hot’ pink and everything in between.

There’s also the stunning and sought-after orange-pink padparadscha sapphire, whose name derives from the Sinhalese word for ‘aquatic lotus blossom.’ This stone has an extraordinary colour reminiscent of sunset.

WHY YOU’LL LOVE PINK SAPPHIRE
Sapphire is an extremely durable stone with very good hardness and high brilliance which makes it one of the world’s top gemstones - on par with rubies, diamonds and spinels.

pink sapphire gem notes

HOW TO WEAR PINK SAPPHIRE
Opt for light pink sapphires or fabulous neon pinks. Even more rare is the pink-orange padparadscha sapphire. There exist exclusive and gorgeous pink stones to suit any occasion.

Getting engaged? And like a bold statement to express your story? Try an intense pink sapphire instead of the diamond (if you dare…). 

BY SEASON
⭐️ For summer, try bolder, brilliant pigments like flashy neon pink or a stone that sparkles with orange undertones.
⭐️ For winter, heat up with warmer and darker pinks.

A PEEK INTO THE HISTORY OF SAPPHIRE

The most mythical sapphires are the blue sapphires from Kashmir, found in the Great Himalayan mountains of northwestern India in the 1800s. The remote mine has been exhausted since the 1920s but some stones can still be found in the market very occasionally.

Pink sapphires became more widely available when new deposits were found in Madagascar in the late 1990s. Until then, these pink gems were considered exceptionally rare since they were only found in a few locations around the world, such as Sri Lanka and Myanmar. Pink sapphires over 1 carat are rare and a pink sapphire over 4 carats is regarded as extremely rare. For that reason, each stone is cut to retain as much of its original weight as possible. But also because colour is its most prized asset and this is more intense in larger stones.

DID YOU KNOW?
⭐️ Considered one of the "Big Four", which also includes rubies, emeralds and diamonds, blue sapphires traditionally symbolise nobility, sincerity, truth and faithfulness. Its striking blue is the standard against which all other blue gemstones (such as blue topaz or tanzanite) are measured against. However, far less well-known in the West is the stunning pink sapphire which can even be considered more rare than the blue sapphire.
⭐️ The more red the pink colour contains, the more expensive it will be because it will be coming close to a ruby which is even more rare than a pink sapphire. The tricky thing hereby is that what one gem dealer may consider a pink sapphire, another may consider a ruby as colour is a subjective judgement. So, the distinction between ruby and pink sapphire is often open to debate!
⭐️ The intensity of the colour pink will determine its value. Besides that, it’s the size and whether the stone has been heated to obtain that colour pink or whether it naturally came in that colour (the latter being more rare and expensive).
⭐️ The pink sapphire is a wonderful alternative for the pink diamond which is one of the rarest and most expensive of all gemstones, unobtainable for most people except the very wealthy. Pink sapphire is a more affordable alternative and often comes in better, more intense shades of pink than the pink diamond!


3. Pink Tourmaline

pink tourmaline gemstones

ORIGIN
Brazil, Nigeria, Namibia, Zambia, Mozambique, Kenya, Tanzania, Madagascar, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Myanmar, Russia, California and Maine (USA).

COLOURS
Tourmaline comes in a rainbow of colours and its pinks range from the highly coveted raspberry "rubellite" tourmaline to a delicious candy-coloured pink...

WHY YOU’LL LOVE PINK TOURMALINE
With a good hardness and brilliance, it’s an exquisite stone for fine jewellery that’s worn daily.

pink tourmaline gem notes

EXTRA NOTE OF CARE FOR PINK TOURMALINE
Due to their pyro- and piezoelectric properties, tourmaline gemstones need to be wiped down frequently as they tend to attract more dust particles than other gemstones. You can also use warm soapy water and a soft cloth to clean.

HOW TO WEAR PINK TOURMALINE
Tourmalines are versatile, modern and utterly stunning for any occasion.

Getting engaged? Try a candy-coloured pink gem, set with pavé diamonds around it to make the pink gem pop even more.

BY SEASON
⭐️ For summer, try party-perfect hues, like an exquisite neon pink or a delicate pale pink.
⭐️ For winter, opt for deeper, darker stones, the colour of Bordeaux wine.
 
A PEEK INTO THE HISTORY OF TOURMALINE

Brightly coloured Sri Lankan Tourmalines were brought to Europe by navigators from the Dutch East India Company in the late 17th century who gave the stone the name 'aschentreckers' meaning 'ash attractors' because it could attract dust and lint when charged with static electricity and so, they used it to clean their pipes after smoking.

People have probably used tourmalines for centuries but often identified it as some other gemstone based on its colour until the arrival of modern gemology. Since it comes in an endless array of dazzling colours, it’s easy to understand why people used to confuse tourmaline with other gems. 

DID YOU KNOW?
⭐️ The historic confusion surrounding tourmalines can even be derived from the stone’s name, which comes from the word Toramalli meaning “mixed gems” in Sinhalese.
⭐️ Intense pink (and other coloured) tourmalines are often accentuated with diamonds in rings, earrings and necklaces by high jewellery houses, such as Louis Vuitton, Chopard, Chanel, Dior and Cartier.
⭐️ Tourmalines have also been mined in the USA. One of the earliest reports of tourmaline in California was in 1892.
 

4. Pink Morganite

morganite gemstones

ORIGIN
Brazil, Mozambique, Madagascar, Afghanistan, Namibia, USA (Maine and California)

COLOURS
Light pink, orange peach-pink and salmon pink

WHY YOU’LL LOVE PINK MORGANITE
Morganites have good hardness and excellent transparency. They often come in lighter candy-like pastel shades of pink that are hard to resist.

morganite gem notes

EXTRA NOTE OF CARE FOR PINK MORGANITE
Precious ‘beryl’ (the family to which morganite belongs) is sensitive to pressure and vulnerable to household chemicals. Although beryl is one of the more durable gemstone types, it still requires careful handling (but this applies to all gemstones, including diamonds).
Avoid wearing beryl jewellery when working with harsh chemicals or household cleaners, such as bleach or acid.
Morganite can easily scratch other gemstones, such as common quartz gemstones (like purple amethyst, yellow citrine and rose quartz). And this gemstone can itself be scratched by harder gemstones, such as rubies, sapphires, spinels and diamonds. So, always keep them apart (like you should with all your fine jewellery pieces!).

HOW TO WEAR PINK MORGANITE
This light pink stone shimmers like the night sky, and is a unique selection for any occasion.

Getting engaged? This light pink gem is particularly stunning as an engagement ring. However, you need to see if it suits your style and looks as it doesn’t suit every lady. 

BY SEASON
⭐️ For summer, try its light rose petal-coloured hues.
⭐️ For winter, opt for the deeper, peachy pink variety to warm up those cold days…
 
A PEEK INTO THE HISTORY OF PINK MORGANITE

Pink morganite was first discovered in Madagascar in 1910 and is also known as pink beryl. Shortly thereafter, George F. Kunz, a famous American gemologist and buyer for Tiffany's, renamed it in honour of J.P. Morgan, the American banker who was said to have been an avid gem collector. Among the beryls, morganite is one of the rarest gems and has been prized by gem collectors.

DID YOU KNOW?
⭐️ ​Morganite was named after J.P. Morgan, the American banker, who was a fervent gemstone lover himself. 
⭐️ Morganite belongs to the same illustrious beryl family as emerald and aquamarine.
⭐️ It is often eye-clean (it has few or no inclusions inside the stone, unlike its sister, emerald, which is typically heavily included!) and comes in larger sizes as well.
⭐️ The stone is considered affordable, especially considering its rarity. Morganite may be hard to find in local retail stores as it’s still relatively uncommon. However, online dealers can provide morganite in every size, shape and cut. 
 

5. Malaya Garnet

malaya garnet gemstones

ORIGIN
Kenya, Tanzania, Madagascar

COLOURS
Pink-orange ranging from salmon-y pastel to deeply saturated hues

WHY YOU’LL LOVE MALAYA GARNET
Malaya garnets have remarkable brilliance and the finest quality can display scintillating red flashes. Its pink-orange hue also makes for a great substitute for the even rarer (and highly priced) padparadscha sapphire. Fine quality malaya garnets are so rare and special that you’ll be one of the few on the planet wearing one…

malaya garnet gem notes

HOW TO WEAR MALAYA GARNET
Malaya garnet's great hardness and brilliance make it one of the world's highest quality rare gemstones. It can be worn in a variety of jewellery pieces. Why not use it to build your dream custom jewellery piece for any and every occasion? 

BY SEASON
⭐️ For summer, try a lighter pastel malaya - a perfect colour to match any sun-kissed skin-tone.
⭐️ For winter, the dark malaya garnet with a reddish-orange tone would add brilliant sparkle to your winter attire.

A PEEK INTO THE HISTORY OF MALAYA GARNET
Malaya (malaia) garnet was first discovered in the 1960s. It was found in the Umba River Valley bordering Tanzania and Kenya which remains the primary source for Malaya garnet today. In the 1990s, a second commercial source was discovered in Bekily, Madagascar.

The term "malaya" was derived from a Swahili word meaning 'outcast'. Miners gave it this name because when it was first discovered, local dealers wouldn't buy it, simply because it didn't fall into any of the standard garnet categories; and so, it was cast aside! If only they’d known.

Malaya garnet is one of the rarer and more interesting 'hybrid' varieties of garnet. In fact, garnet comes in 6 main mineral groups / species -- almandine, andradite, grossular, pyrope, spessartine and uvarovite -- and often they form chemical mixtures between 2 or 3 garnet species, as is the case here with malaya garnet. 

DID YOU KNOW?
⭐️ Malaya garnet is primarily a mix of the species pyrope and spessartine garnet but some stones can even contain parts of the other 4 garnet groups. This makes garnet one of the hardest stones to identify and always forms a nice challenge for gemologists…
⭐️ Garnets are one of the few gemstones that typically do not receive treatments (i.e. they are not ‘enhanced’) in any way and so their colours are fully natural. And so far, this variety also hasn’t been recreated as a synthetic (man-made) gemstone either!
⭐️ Since its discovery, the production and mining of malaya garnet has been very irregular and because of its rarity, it is highly prized by gem collectors.


6. Padparadscha Sapphire

padparascha sapphire gemstones

ORIGIN
Sri Lanka, Madagascar, Tanzania

COLOURS
A mixture of pink and orange. The perfect padparadscha should be 50% pink and 50% orange. Where and how to draw that line is always open to debate...

WHY YOU’LL LOVE PADPARADSCHA SAPPHIRE
The delicate colour of this stone makes for a rare, show-stopping sparkle. Paired with the unbeatable quality characteristics of sapphire, it makes the perfect alternative engagement ring stone or statement ring for daily wear.

padparadscha sapphire gem notes

HOW TO WEAR PADPARADSCHA SAPPHIRE
Getting engaged? Nothing compares to the elegance and rare colour of a padparadscha sapphire for an unbelievably stunning alternative engagement ring

BY SEASON
⭐️ 
For summer, with colour that mimics a summer sunset, the padparadscha sapphire will fit any summer style from day to night.
⭐️ For winter, use this stone to warm your usual darker cold weather wardrobe in a statement ring with some diamonds or in a necklace.

A PEEK INTO THE HISTORY OF PADPARADSCHA
For over a hundred years, reference has been made to an extremely rare sapphire which was first discovered in Sri Lanka, in the mesmerising colour of a lotus flower which most people in the West have never seen before. The term padparadscha actually comes from a Sinhalese word used to the describe the colour of an aquatic lotus flower.

The stone’s colour is caused by a combination of iron and chromium trace elements. Traders often push gemology labs to state the name ‘padparadscha’ on a gem certificate for a stone that doesn’t actually fall within the true padparadscha range as they know the jump in price a stone with that title will bring...

What matters most is for the colour grading to be carried out by gemologists from an international lab who have knowledge and expertise in colour stone grading and also an eye for beauty - rather than being driven by commercial intentions. That way, we can at least trust the certificate when it states ‘padparadscha sapphire’.

DID YOU KNOW?
⭐️ 
Due to the rarity of rough padparadscha, the stone will often be seen with an asymmetrical shape because they're cut to preserve as much of the stone as possible.
⭐️ Clarity is an important aspect of the padparadscha sapphire. This is because their light colour can easily reveal inclusions and imperfections.
⭐️ Padparadschas over 2 carats in weight are considered extremely rare.
⭐️ Madagascar padparadschas are known to be a bit pinker in colour and usually sell for about 20% less than those from Sri Lanka - where the highest quality padparadschas are normally found. These stones from Madagascar can be heat-treated to intensify their pink colour.
⭐️ Princess Eugenie of the UK got engaged with a padparadscha sapphire.

Hopefully you now have an idea of which pink jewel suits you to perfection!

 

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