A   List   of   Yellow  Gemstones

Hello Yellow

1. Mali Garnet

ORIGIN
Mali in Africa

COLORS
 yellow, green-yellow, golden-yellow, brown

WHY YOU’LL LOVE MALI GARNET
Mail garnet is one of the rarest of the garnet group with a spectacular brilliance and dispersion that will turn heads wherever you go.

HOW TO WEAR MALI GARNET

This rare beauty is suited for all kinds of wear - the sky is the limit...

By season: 

  • For summer, this glowing yellow stone is a perfect match for all of your summer adventures. Try it set in matte gold with two smaller diamonds on either side for an extra sparkly look. 
  • For winter, a deeper golden hue pairs well with an earth-tone winter wardrobe (think forest greens and warm browns).

A PEEK INTO THE HISTORY OF MALI GARNET

Mali garnet was named after Africa's Republic of Mali where the gem was first discovered in 1994. Mali continues to be the only known source of this stone to this day.

Mali garnets first appeared on the market around the 2000s when parcels were offered by African dealers in Bangkok. The lack of water and the high temperatures in Mali makes the mining of these stones problematic and production has been declining, making this jewel more of a collectors item - rare and valuable. 

DID YOU KNOW?

  • The rarest chrome-green color is mali garnet's most valued hue. 
  • Mali garnet is perfect for faceting because of its remarkable fire and dispersion. 
  • Like its sister stone, tsavorite garnet, mali garnet owes its green colors to hints of chromium (for the green variety).
  • Stones over 5cts are quite uncommon and price per carat increases dramatically with size.

2. Golden Beryl

ORIGIN
Namibia, Brazil, Madagascar, Nigeria, Zimbabwe, Sri Lanka

COLORS
Lemon-yellow, golden-yellow


WHY YOU’LL LOVE GOLDEN BERYL
Golden beryl is another gemstone with great durability - suitable for daily wear in rings, bracelets, earrings, necklace and any other dream jewelry piece. If you've dreamed of a rare yellow stone that's different from the rest, this one is a beautiful alternative.  

HOW TO WEAR GOLDEN BERYL
With its great hardness and durability, golden beryl would make a beautiful solitaire engagement ring but if you're looking for a different daily-wear piece, this stone is also for you!

By Season:

  • For summer, try a pair of stunning golden beryl stud earrings to show off with your hair pulled back in the summer heat.
  • For winter, a golden beryl drop necklace with some diamonds adds brilliance to any winter look.

A PEEK INTO THE HISTORY OF GOLDEN BERYL
Golden beryl was discovered in Namibia in the early 1900s in a deposit where aquamarine was normally found. (Aquamarine is the light blue variety of the same gem species "beryl"). It had been found in other places such as Brazil and Madagascar at an earlier time but the discovery in Namibia was the first to make it known worldwide. Golden beryl can sometimes be confused with heliodor, a light yellow-green variety. However, as there is no clear distinction possible in the yellow and yellow-green tones compared to golden beryl, heliodors are generally rejected as an independent precious beryl variety and are rather seen as belonging to the weak-colored golden beryls. Real golden beryls are usually found at a higher price point. 

DID YOU KNOW?

  • Golden beryl is believed to have many spiritual attributes including protecting its wearer as well as bringing positive energy, assertiveness, strength, confidence and control. 
  • Some rare golden or yellow beryl exhibits a "cat's eye" - a thin white line that runs down the center of the stone. Yellow beryl with perfect coloring and the "eye" clearly contrasting against the yellow are considered most valuable. 
  • The largest golden beryl to be successfully faceted is over 2,000 carats and is displayed in the Smithsonian in Washington D.C. (USA). 

3. Lemon Quartz

ORIGIN
Brazil, Madagascar, USA

COLORS
lemon-yellow

WHY YOU’LL LOVE LEMON QUARTZ
Its brilliant tangy yellow color reminds you of a refreshing glass of sparkling lemonade... what's not to love?

HOW TO WEAR LEMON QUARTZ
Quartz has good hardness and can be worn in a stunning ring, set of earrings or necklace.

Purple Rain - Amethyst and Lemon Quartz with 18K Yellow Gold Earrings

By Season:

  • For summer, stun at your evening events with bright yellow sparkles in a ring set with diamonds around it.
  • For winter, stun in a pair of lemon quartz earrings to add a golden glow throughout your daily adventures. 

A PEEK INTO THE HISTORY OF LEMON QUARTZ
The known history of quartz dates all the way to the 1800s, possibly sooner, and has been valued for a variety of uses since then including use as oscillators in watches, radios and pressure gauges. Of course, the colorful varieties of quartz are also valued for fine jewelry design. 

DID YOU KNOW?

  • Lemon quartz (along with other colorful quartz varieties) can also exhibit a cat's eye or star phenomenon within the stone due to fine asbestos or rutile fibers. 
  • Quartz can be found in many varieties of color - each color is due to trace elements added to the silicon dioxide base. 
  • Natural yellow quartz - also called citrine but that can include the orange quartz variety as well - is rare. Most commercial citrines are heat-treated amethysts (a fully acceptable treatment in the gem market).

4. Danburite

ORIGIN
Danbury (Connecticut, USA), Mexico, Bolivia, Burma (Myanmar), Japan, Madagascar, Russia

COLORS
colorless, light pink, light yellow, light brown/tan

WHY YOU’LL LOVE DANBURITE
It's hardness is up there with the more popular stones like quartz and topaz - making it an excellent choice for a custom, colorful jewelry design.

image credit: GIA.edu

HOW TO WEAR DANBURITE
Rings, necklaces, pendants - danburite is suited for all jewelry applications (if you can find one...). 

By Season:

  • For summer, a danburite pendant necklace will glow up any flowing cocktail party dress. 
  • For winter, try a danburite bracelet paired with your favorite colorful pants and coat.

A PEEK INTO THE HISTORY OF DANBURITE
Danburite was first discovered in the early 1800s (1830) in Danbury, Connecticut - from which it was named. Oddly enough, this deposit is buried deep beneath the city and yields no gem-quality danburite deposits. Most of the today's danburite comes from Mexico but gem-quality danburite can also be found in the places noted above (under 'Origin'). Top grade gemstones exhibit high transparency and very few inclusions.

DID YOU KNOW?

  • Yellow danburite between 7-10 carats is considered extremely rare.
  • Danburite is valued more by gemstone connoisseurs because it lacks the fire required by most mainstream jewelers and designers. Don't let that deter you from this stone - its luster makes up for it!
  • Oval is the most common shape for cutting danburite as it is the shape that will preserve most of its carat weight. 

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