A   List  of  Red  Gemstones

Radiant Red Gems

1. Red Beryl (Bixbite)

ORIGIN
Utah, USA. There is only one known commercial occurrence of the extremely rare, gem-quality red beryl in the world which is the Ruby Violet (or red beryl) mine in the Wah Wah Mountains of Beaver County, Utah.

COLORS
Pink to deep-red.

WHY YOU’LL LOVE RED BERYL
It belongs to the beryl family and so is related to the more famous emerald and aquamarine. This beautiful, raspberry red stone is known to have a variety of healing and health benefits, some of which include increased energy, stamina and unity within relationships. It's also extremely rare and valuable! If you love bold, eye-catching red sparkles, this is the jewel for you - if you can get hold of one 🙄

Red Beryl Info
Red Beryl

image credit: GIA.edu

HOW TO WEAR RED BERYL

The pinkish hue of this stone may be partial to those with warmer undertones to their skin but luckily for us all, the deeper, brick-red hues flatter any skin tone. 

By season: 

  • For summer, a pair of red beryl stud earrings are perfect for your all-day, outdoor adventures.
  • For winter, an eye-catching ring with wine-red Beryl will help you sparkle through the months of sweater weather.

A PEEK INTO THE HISTORY OF RED BERYL

Since its discovery in 1904 by bookkeeper-turned-miner Maynard Bixby, this material has remained one of the rarest color varieties of gem beryl, with its increased recognition and acceptance in the marketplace being offset by the continued limited scale of production.

It was originally called Bixbite in honor of Maynard Bixby, however, this name has fallen out of favor due to confusion between it and Bixbyite (a cubic, black, manganese iron oxide also discovered by Bixby in 1897). And red beryl seems the preferred name now.

As stated by Gem-A, the largest gemological institute in the UK: 

"To put its rarity into perspective, only one red beryl is mined for every 150,000 diamonds, and a two carat red beryl is considered as rare as a 40 carat diamond! The largest known faceted red beryl is 8.0 carats."

DID YOU KNOW?

  • For every 150,000 gem-quality diamonds, 1 red beryl crystal is found, making this one of the world's rarest gemstones.
  • Red beryl receives its color from trace amounts of manganese.
  • Prices can come in at around $10,000 per carat, which makes red beryl one of the most expensive gemstones in the world.
  • While it is found in other locations, mainly New Mexico, Utah is the main source of gem-quality red beryl.

2. Red Spinel

ORIGIN
Sri Lanka (today's Ceylon), Myanmar, Tajikistan, Tanzania and Madagascar.

COLORS
Orange-red, purple-red, or ruby-red

WHY YOU’LL LOVE RED SPINEL
Considered to be the better ruby by some of the world's best gem dealers, the red variety of spinel shines just as bright with an equally intriguing history and comes in alluring red hues. 

Spinel Info

HOW TO WEAR RED SPINEL
Getting engaged? Try a romantic red spinel as the centre stone in your custom ring design. 

By Season:

red spinel
  • For summer, stand out from the crowds with a pair of dazzling spinel earrings that you can show off by pulling your hair back to cool off from the summer sun.
  • For winter, a red spinel ring paired with a deep red lipstick adds the perfect touch of mystery to your winter wardrobe. 

A PEEK INTO THE HISTORY OF RED SPINEL
Spinels are most famous for having been mistaken for rubies in ancient royal jewelry. It is unknown how many spinels were sold as rubies throughout history as it wasn't until the 18th century that "ruby" was the name given solely to the red variety of the corundum mineral and the term "spinel" was first used. Because of their confusion with ruby, spinels didn't have the reputation they deserved for a long time. After they became recognized as their own mineral, they eventually earned the value they deserved and are now considered a remarkable ruby-substitute and top fine-quality gemstone.

DID YOU KNOW?

  • The 'Black Prince's Ruby' and the "Timur Ruby', both part of the British Crown Jewels, were mined in Tajikistan and are actually spinels. 
  • Red is regarded as the most valuable of the spinel hues. 
  • Red spinel is associated with wealth and luck in business and is known to increase positivity and success in one's career.

3. Ruby

ORIGIN
Burma, Mozambique, Thailand, Afghanistan, Namibia, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Cambodia and Vietnam.

COLORS
Pink-red to blood-red


WHY YOU’LL LOVE RUBY
If you love a classic, this stone is for you. Ruby's lore speaks for itself.

Ruby Info

HOW TO WEAR RUBY
Neutral colors in your style really make the ruby stand out and ensure that your look isn't too much. Rubies are also a go-to for an alternative engagement ring or statement piece. 

By Season:

  • For summer, adorn yourself with dangling, dazzling ruby-earrings paired with a bright pink sundress for an overall vibrant summer look.
  • For winter, opt for a dazzling statement ring paired with your favorite cold-weather attire. 
Ruby

image credit: GIA.edu

A PEEK INTO THE HISTORY OF RUBY
Because rubies have been around for so long, their history is a bit of a mystery. This precious stone is even mentioned in the Bible in association with wisdom and beauty. Many famous pieces featuring rubies are displayed in museums around the world including the DeLong Star Ruby, displayed in the Museum of Natural History in New York City and the Carmen Lucia Ruby, set in a platinum ring which was donated to the Smithsonian. 

DID YOU KNOW?

  • Burmese ruby is the term used in reference to the world's finest rubies, mined in Myanmar.
  • Rubies without imperfections are exceptionally rare and often come with price tags higher than diamonds.
  • The most expensive Burmese ruby to sell at auction was the “Sunrise Ruby". It weighed 25.59 carats, was mounted by Cartier and brought in $30.38 million at Sotheby's Geneva Magnificent Jewels and Noble Jewels Sale in May 2015.
  • "Pigeons Blood" is the most desirable ruby hue... a deep red color with slight hints of blue.

4. Imperial Topaz

ORIGIN
Brazil

COLORS
Reddish-Orange, Sherry Red, Peach, Champagne, Yellow, Golden Brown

WHY YOU’LL LOVE IMPERIAL TOPAZ
Its unique, extraordinary coloring and reputation as one of the rarest jewels around make it worthy of your consideration when shopping for a loose gemstone or rare gemstone jewelry piece. Looking for something to break out on special occasions and dazzle anyone in your path? You've found your jewel.

Topaz Info

HOW TO WEAR IMPERIAL TOPAZ
Imperial topaz is best cut in elongated shapes, emerald cut, oval, pear-shaped, etc. It would surely make for a one-of-a-kind alternative engagement ring on its own or set between two smaller stones. Bezel settings are recommended (rather than pronged settings) for daily wear to protect the stone which has something that's called 'basal cleavage' and makes it more fragile to break.

By Season:

  • For summer, an emerald cut imperial topaz ring is sure to turn some heads at your poolside cocktail parties.
  • For winter, add a touch of pink-red hot sparkle to your winter attire with a set of pear-shaped imperial topaz drop earrings.
Imperial Topaz

image credit: GIA.edu

A PEEK INTO THE HISTORY OF IMPERIAL TOPAZ
One of the rarest and most valuable varieties of topaz, the now famed Imperial topaz is normally a pinkish orange with red flashes and is solely found in Brazil. The name imperial topaz originated in nineteenth century Russia when Russia's Ural Mountains were the leading source of all topaz. It was named in honor of the Russian Czar and was only allowed to be owned by royalty at that time. Today, this variety of topaz comes in much smaller quantities on the market than the treated blue topaz. Top imperial topaz can sell for thousands of US Dollars per carat on the wholesale market...

DID YOU KNOW?

  • Imperial topaz is the rarest variety of topaz and also the most sought-after.
  • Sherry red is the most valuable and sought-after hue of imperial topaz.
  • Imperial topaz has perfect basal cleavage which makes it easier to cut than other gemstones but also means it can break easier than most other stones with equal hardness.
  • The Field Museum of Natural History (USA) holds the famous "Blaze Imperial Topaz" which weighs 97.45 carats.

To arrange a one-on-one consultation with Eva and explore these and other stones up close and in person, please book an appointment here

Visit Gems & Jewels for more information on other colored stones.

Eva Gems & Jewels Logo

Become  an  insider

Join those in the know who enjoy shopping direct for their high-end, personalized gemstone pieces,

get unprecedented access to stones that are usually only available to the world’s high jewelry houses

and be the first to hear about insider jewelry events

We collect, use, and process your data according to the terms of our privacy policy.

Back to Top