A   List   of   Orange  Gemstones

A List of Gemstones in Shades of Orange

1. Spessartite Garnet

ORIGIN
Namibia, Burma (Myanmar), Brazil, Madagascar, Tanzania, Kenya, USA

COLORS
Orange, yellow-orange, red-orange to red-brown. Before the discovery of Fanta orange mandarin garnets in the 1990s, bright, orangish reds were the most valuable spessartite colors.

WHY YOU’LL LOVE SPESSARTITE GARNET
The brilliance and hardness of spessartite make it a great choice for jewelry, especially as its one of the few high-quality orange gemstones out there.

HOW TO WEAR SPESSARTITE GARNET

With reasonable care, this stone can last for decades in an unbeatable jewelry piece. Always store this stone separately from other hard stones or make sure its properly wrapped in cloth and protected from rubbing up against other stones to prevent scratches.  

By season: 

  • For summer, find a piece featuring a spessartite garnet in a yellow gold setting - the perfect way to highlight the warmth of this stone.
  • For winter, choose a white gold setting and some diamonds scattered around it to add a stunning contrast and a cool winter look.

A PEEK INTO THE HISTORY OF SPESSARTITE GARNET

Spessartite deposits were first found in the Spessart Mountains in Germany in the 1880s. In fact, the name spessartite came from the Bavarian word "Spessart" meaning "forest". In ancient times, spessartite garnets were used to represent authority and power among the Egyptians, Greek and Romans. In the Middle Ages, the stone was used as a symbol of truth and faith. Today, the bright hues of spessartite are believed to help battle depression and stimulate creativity, communication and analyticaly thinking. 

DID YOU KNOW?

  • Although spessartite is a very common garnet, gem quality spessartite is actually very rare.
  • The most expensive spessartites are the rich mandarin oranges and the deep burnt orange/red gems.
  • Spessartites are typically included with small bubbles or crystals and can give the stone a slight glow that's hard to capture on camera.

2. Malaya Garnet

ORIGIN
Kenya, Tanzania, Madagascar

COLORS
Pink-orange ranging from salmon-y pastel to deeply saturated hues


WHY YOU’LL LOVE MALAYA GARNET
Malaya garnets have remarkable brilliance, and the finest quality can display scintillating red flashes. Its pink-orange hue also makes for a great substitute for the even rarer (and highly priced) padparadscha sapphire. Fine quality malaya garnets are so rare and special that you’ll be one of the few on the planet wearing one…

HOW TO WEAR MALAYA GARNET
Malaya garnet's great hardness and brilliance make it one of the world's highest quality rare gemstones. It can be worn in a variety of jewelry pieces. Why not use it to build your dream custom jewelry piece for any and every occasion? 

By Season:

  • For summer, try a lighter pastel malaya - a perfect color to match any sun-kissed skin-tone.
  • For winter, the dark malaya garnet with a reddish-orange tone would add brilliant sparkle to your winter attire.

A PEEK INTO THE HISTORY OF MALAYA GARNET
Malaya (Malaia) garnet was first discovered in the 1960s. It was found in the Umba River Valley bordering Tanzania and Kenya, which remains the primary source for Malaya garnet today. In the 1990s, a second commercial source was discovered in Bekily, Madagascar. The term "malaya" was derived from a Swahili word meaning 'outcast'. Miners gave it this name because when it was first discovered, local dealers wouldn't buy it, simply because it didn't fall into any of the standard garnet categories; and so, it was cast aside! If only they’d known. Malaya garnet is one of the rarer and more interesting 'hybrid' varieties of garnet. In fact, garnet comes in 6 main mineral groups / species -- almandine, andradite, grossular, pyrope, spessartine and uvarovite -- and often they form chemical mixtures between 2 or 3 garnet species, as is the case here with Malaya garnet. 

DID YOU KNOW?

  • Malaya garnet is primarily a mix of the species pyrope and spessartine garnet, but some stones can even contain parts of the other 4 garnet groups. This makes garnet one of the hardest stones to identify and always forms a nice challenge for gemologists…
  • Garnets are one of the few gemstones that typically do not receive treatments (i.e. they are not ‘enhanced’) in any way, and so their colors are fully natural. And so far, this variety also hasn’t been recreated as a synthetic (man-made) gemstone either.
  • Since its discovery, the production and mining of malaya garnet has been very irregular, and because of its rarity, it is highly prized by gem collectors.

3. Padparadscha Sapphire

ORIGIN
Sri Lanka, Madagascar, Tanzania

COLORS
A mixture of pink and orange. The perfect padparadscha should be 50% pink and 50% orange. Where and how to draw that line is always open to debate...

WHY YOU’LL LOVE PADPARADSCHA SAPPHIRE
The delicate color of this stone makes for a rare, show-stopping sparkle. Paired with the unbeatable quality characteristics of sapphire, it makes the perfect alternative engagement ring stone or statement ring for daily wear.

HOW TO WEAR PADPARADSCHA SAPPHIRE
Getting engaged? Nothing compares to the elegance and rare color of a padparadscha sapphire for an unbelievably stunning alternative engagement ring

By Season:

  • For summer, with color that mimics a summer sunset, the padparadscha sapphire will fit any summer style from day to night. 
  • For winter, use this stone to warm your usual darker cold weather wardrobe in a statement ring with some diamonds or in a necklace.

A PEEK INTO THE HISTORY OF PADPARADSCHA
For over a hundred years, reference has been made to an extremely rare sapphire which was first discovered in Sri Lanka, in the mesmerizing color of a lotus flower which most people in the West have never seen before. The term padparadscha actually comes from a Sinhalese word used to the describe the color of an aquatic lotus flower. The stone’s color is caused by a combination of iron and chromium trace elements. Traders often push gemology labs to state the name ‘padparadscha’ on a gem certificate for a stone that doesn’t actually fall within the true padparadscha range as they know the jump in price a stone with that title will bring. What matters most is for the color grading to be carried out by gemologists from an international lab who have knowledge, experience and expertise and also an eye for beauty - rather than being driven by commercial intentions. That way, we can at least trust the certificate when it states ‘padparadscha sapphire’.

DID YOU KNOW?

  • Due to the rarity of rough padparadscha, the stone will often be seen with an asymmetrical shape because they're cut to preserve as much of the stone as possible. 
  • Clarity is an important aspect of the padparadscha sapphire. This is because their light color can easily reveal inclusions and imperfections.
  • Padparadschas over 2 carats in weight are considered extremely rare. 
  • Madagascar padparadschas are known to be a bit pinker in color and usually sell for about 20% less than those from Sri Lanka - where the highest quality padparadschas are normally found. These stones from Madagascar can be heat-treated to intensify their pink color.
  • Princess Eugenie of the UK got engaged with a padparadscha sapphire.

4. Zircon

ORIGIN
Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Burma (Myanmar), and Vietnam have the highest deposits of gem-quality zircon. However, zircon in some form can be found on all continents.

COLORS
Orange, yellow, yellow-red, red-brown, green, blue, colorless

WHY YOU’LL LOVE ZIRCON
With its high refractive index and strong dispersion, zircon displays a ton of brilliance and flashes of fire - otherwise known as multi-colored light. For that exact reason, the stone has often been confused with diamond for centuries and more recently, with the lab-grown stone cubic zirconia, a diamond simulant. 

image credit: GIA.edu

HOW TO WEAR ZIRCON
The autumnal, earthy tones of the orange zircon makes it perfect for warmer skin tones. As the stone is brittle and therefore sensitive to knocks and pressure, best to wear in a protective ring setting or use as earrings or in a necklace.

By Season:

  • For summer, a pair of orange zircon earrings glimmering in the sun paired with an olive green beach cover up would make a glamorous earth-inspired look. 
  • For winter, glow up your casual deep brown sweater dress with a zircon pendant or let it shine as a compliment to your sparkly gold evening gown for your special holiday occasions. 

A PEEK INTO THE HISTORY OF ZIRCON
At 4.4 billion years old, zircon found in Australia is the oldest mineral on Earth. Colorless zircon was widely used a diamond simulant in the early 1900s which has given it a bad reputation and association with being an imitation. For many years now, more convincing diamond replacements have come to light and zircon now deserves to be known as the charming, colorful stone that it is. Because of its wide range of colors, there is some confusion about where the name zircon derives from - some believe it comes from the Arabic word zarkun meaning "cinnabar" or "vermillion" while others believe it comes from the Persian word zargun meaning "gold-colored". 

DID YOU KNOW?

  • While zircon sources are limited, typical sizes of zircon also depend on the color. Yellows and oranges are normally found up to around 5 carats. 
  • In the Middle Ages, this stone was thought to induce healthy sleep, drive away evil spirits, and promote wealth, honor, and wisdom.
  • Tiffany's famed gemologist, George Kunz, was a zircon advocate - once proposing the name "Starlight" to promote the stone's blue colored variety, which is created through heating other zircons. This name never caught on. 
  • Zircon is a stone not commonly known to jewelry buyers but it is a favorite among collectors and gemologists. 

5. Imperial Topaz

ORIGIN
Brazil 

COLORS
Reddish-Orange, Sherry Red, Peach, Champagne, Yellow, Golden Brown

WHY YOU’LL LOVE IMPERIAL TOPAZ
Its unique, extraordinary coloring and reputation as one of the rarest jewels around make it worthy of your consideration when shopping for a loose gemstone or rare gemstone jewelry piece. Looking for something to break out on special occasions and dazzle anyone in your path? You've found your jewel (if you're so lucky to get your hands on one that is!).

Imperial Flame Topaz Gemstone

From GIA.edu: "The Imperial Flame, a superb natural color Brazilian topaz, was fashioned from a 615 ct crystal recovered over 20 years ago. The finished piece measures 89.53 × 20.56 × 19.15 mm and weighs 332.24 ct. Photo courtesy Sonja Kreis Unique Jewelry."

HOW TO WEAR IMPERIAL TOPAZ
Imperial topaz is best cut in elongated shapes, emerald cut, oval, pear-shaped, etc. It would surely make for a one-of-a-kind alternative engagement ring on its own or set between two smaller stones. Bezel settings are recommended (rather than pronged settings) for daily wear to protect the stone which has something that's called 'basal cleavage' and makes it more fragile to break.

By Season:

  • For summer, an emerald cut imperial topaz ring is sure to turn some heads at your poolside cocktail parties.
  • For winter, add a touch of warm pink-orange sparkle to your winter attire with a set of exquisitely rare pear-shaped imperial topaz drop earrings.

A PEEK INTO THE HISTORY OF IMPERIAL TOPAZ
One of the rarest and most valuable varieties of topaz, the now famed Imperial topaz is normally a pinkish orange with red flashes and is solely found in Brazil. The name imperial topaz originated in nineteenth century Russia when Russia's Ural Mountains were the leading source of all topaz. It was named in honor of the Russian Czar and was only allowed to be owned by royalty at that time. Today, this variety of topaz comes in much smaller quantities on the market than the treated blue topaz. Top imperial topaz can sell for thousands of US Dollars per carat on the wholesale market...

DID YOU KNOW?

  • Sherry-red is the most valuable hue of imperial topaz. 
  • The Field Museum of Natural History (USA) holds the famous "Blaze Imperial Topaz" which weighs 97.45 carats
  • Imperial topaz has perfect basal cleavage which makes it easier to cut than other gemstones but also means it can break easier than most other stones with equal hardness.

To arrange a one-on-one consultation with Eva and explore these and other stones up close and in person, please book an appointment here

Visit Gems & Jewels for more information on other colored stones.

Eva Gems & Jewels Logo

Become  an  insider

Join those in the know who enjoy shopping direct for their high-end, personalized gemstone pieces,

get unprecedented access to stones that are usually only available to the world’s high jewelry houses

and be the first to hear about insider jewelry events

We collect, use, and process your data according to the terms of our privacy policy.

Insert Image

Back to Top